Bookbabble in Facebook!

Aug 18, 2009 by

Bookbabble is now also on Facebook as well.  I created the Bookbabble Facebook page a couple of weeks ago, and am now waiting to get a vanity URL for it so that I can say, “Hey, go to facebook.com/bookbabble!”.  This is not possible yet, but if you’d like to have a peek at the place, do hop over to the page here.

There’s plenty to do there: you can post messages as you would anyone’s Facebook wall, you can start discussions, or you could simply comment on the items that gets posted.  At the moment you’ll find notifications of new episodes, and all the tweets from the @bookbabbleshow Twitter account will show up here as well.

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Bookbabble now appears in Miro’s Guide!

Aug 18, 2009 by

In Bookbabble’s slow trek across the huge expanse of the digital frontier, this is another small step.  Bookbabble is now listed in Miro Guide, a listing of the best free audio and video podcasts on the Internet, which also doubles as a landing page for one of the most popular open-source video player and podcast client, Miro.

I’ve been using Miro for quite a while now, to download and watch the myriad free video podcasts available (mainly technology-related, with some Monty Python thrown in).  It is easy to use, and now with its support for audio podcast, heartily recommended if you’re not already using a good podcast aggregator to get Bookbabble episodes.

Very soon now I’ll write up something on podcasts for Bookbabble.net readers, as not too many people are familiar with the concept, and how it makes it easier for listeners to get Bookbabble episodes.

So go check us out by searching for Bookbabble in Miro Guide.

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Bookbabble Episode 42: Online Author Fanaticism

Aug 15, 2009 by

Bookbabble Episode 42: Online Author Fanaticism

Recorded 10 Aug 2009
Babblers: Gem, Renee, Marcel, Donny

Synopsis:  
The babblers talk about the enthusiasm that surrounds some authors online, based upon the article “Why do Pynchon, Ballard and Wallace provoke such online loyalty?” from Times Online. 

 

Show Length: 1:33:18 mins

 

Links:

Books Mentioned:

 

 

[audio:http://m.podshow.com/media/17719/episodes/173021/bookbabbletheshow-173021-08-14-2009.mp3]

 

Download episode here.

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Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 2: Poetry Revisited

Aug 8, 2009 by

Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 2: Poetry Revisited

Recorded 3 Aug 2009
Babblers: Bjorn, Renee, Lone, Marcel, Donny and guest Liam Brannelly

Synopsis:
Renee and Marcel have been itching to talk poetry for a while now, and having rescheduled this topic for several weeks, it’s like the floodgates have finally been blown to bloody bits.  For this show, Marcel brought along a nice, intelligent fellow, Liam, who’s a student of medieval literature in New York City who guzzles Beowulf and Chaucer for school and fun.

This show brings together poetry lovers, casual poetry readers, poets and students of poetry all mixed in a heady broth.  There’s appreciation, recitation, and babbling incoherence (oh wait, that’s me).

Oh, did I mention there’s a famous German poem recited in this episode?

This show broke all previous records for show length, and has been broken into 2 parts.  This is Part 2.

Show Length: 85:54 mins

Poems Mentioned in show:

Mentioned in show:

* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears here):

My heart, I said, it was thine;

Thy heart, you said, it was mine

And you said you liked the couplet

Where your tears were mine when you wept

So these were the rhymes we made

Then you married sensibly

I get royalties each time it’s played

And nothing has changed for me

Liam’s Favourite Poets:

  • Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)
  • Tennyson
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Yeats
  • Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Jack Clemo (Cornwall)

Links:

[audio:http://m.podshow.com/media/17719/episodes/169344/bookbabbletheshow-169344-08-07-2009.mp3]

Download episode here.

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Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 1: Poetry Revisited

Aug 7, 2009 by

Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 1: Poetry Revisited

Recorded 3 Aug 2009
Babblers: Bjorn, Renee, Lone, Marcel, Donny and guest Liam Brannelly

Synopsis:
Renee and Marcel have been itching to talk poetry for a while now, and having rescheduled this topic for several weeks, it’s like the floodgates have finally been blown to bloody bits.  For this show, Marcel brought along a nice, intelligent fellow, Liam, who’s a student of medieval literature in New York City who guzzles Beowulf and Chaucer for school and fun.

This show brings together poetry lovers, casual poetry readers, poets and students of poetry all mixed in a heady broth.  There’s appreciation, recitation, and babbling incoherence (oh wait, that’s me).

Oh, did I mention there’s a famous German poem recited in this episode?

This show broke all previous records for show length, and has been broken into 2 parts.  This is Part 1.

Show Length: 49:24 mins

Poems Mentioned in show:

Mentioned in show:

* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears here):

My heart, I said, it was thine;

Thy heart, you said, it was mine

And you said you liked the couplet

Where your tears were mine when you wept

So these were the rhymes we made

Then you married sensibly

I get royalties each time it’s played

And nothing has changed for me

Liam’s Favourite Poets:

  • Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)
  • Tennyson
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Yeats
  • Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Jack Clemo (Cornwall)

Links:

[audio:http://m.podshow.com/media/17719/episodes/169254/bookbabbletheshow-169254-08-07-2009.mp3]

Download episode here.

<p><b>Poems Mentioned in show:</b></p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.ronnowpoetry.com/contents/vanduyn/IntoMexico.html”>Into Mexico</a>, Mona Van Duyn </li>

<li><a href=”http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poem/702.html”>Homo Will Not Inherit</a>, Mark Doty </li>

<li><a href=”http://www.librarius.com/troicris.htm”>Troilus and Criseyde</a>, Geoffrey Chaucer </li>

<li><a href=”http://nordicvoices.blogspot.com/2009/04/michael-strunge-two-poems.html”>Michael Strunge</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://englishhistory.net/keats/poetry/odeonagrecianurn.html”>Ode on a Grecian Urn</a>, George Keats </li>
</ul>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15401″ target=”_blank”>somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond, by E. E. Cummings</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/another-reason-why-i-don-t-keep-a-gun-in-the-hou/” target=”_blank”>Another Reason Why I Don’t Keep A Gun In The House, Billy Collins</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://oldpoetry.com/opoem/29811-Vladimir-Vladimirovich-Mayakovsky-A-Cloud-In-Trousers—part-IV” target=”_blank”>A Cloud in Trousers, Vladimir Mayakovsky</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://sprayberry.tripod.com/poems/howl.txt” target=”_blank”>Howl, Allen Ginsburg</a> (Interesting history on this poem in this <a href=”http://www.pacifica.org/program-guide/op,segment-page/station_id,4/segment_id,469/” target=”_blank”>article</a>).</li>

<li><a href=”http://andersdenken20.de/2009/04/20/paul-celan-todesfuge-fugue-of-death/” target=”_blank”>Todesfuge [Fugue of Death], Paul Celan</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12169″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 41: If we sang in the wood (and Death is a German expert) by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12053″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 29: There sat down, once, a thing by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12142″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 74: Henry hates the world. What the world to Henry by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12011″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 1: Huffy Henry hid the day by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12008″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 14: Life, friends, is boring by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/dolphin/” target=”_blank”>Dolphin, Robert Lowell</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://guccipiggy.objectis.net/poetry/plath/ladylazarus” target=”_blank”>Lady Lazarus, Slyvia Plath</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.jeremygregg.com/quotes/jamesmerrill/lost%20in%20translation.htm” target=”_blank”>Lost in Translation, by James Merrill</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://guccipiggy.objectis.net/poetry/merrill/worldandchild” target=”_blank”>The World and The Child, by James Merrill</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://torch.cs.dal.ca/~johnston/poetry/resume.html” target=”_blank”>Resume, Dorothy Parker</a></li>
</ul>

<p><b></b></p>

<p><b>Mentioned in show:</b> </p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/1594202249/?tag=bookbabble-20″>Inherent Vice</a>, Thomas Pynchon </li>

<li><a href=”http://www.nonsenselit.org/Lear/”>Edward Lear Home Page</a> </li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%B8ren_Ulrik_Thomsen”>Søren Ulrik Thomsen</a>, and <a href=”http://www.literaturfestival.com/bios1_3_6_738.html”>here</a></li>
</ul>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.curbstone.org/bookdetail.cfm?BookID=118″ target=”_blank”>Jens August Schade</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Mayakovsky” target=”_blank”>Vladimir Mayakovsky</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.loneh.dk/” target=”_blank”>Lone Hørslev</a> (Danish)</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Celan ” target=”_blank”>Paul Celan</a> (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/089255276X/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://user.tninet.se/~jll006w/nfeng.htm” target=”_blank”>Nils Ferlin</a>*</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Strunge” target=”_blank”>Michael Strunge</a></li>

<li>Mark Strand (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0393321789/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brad_Leithauser” target=”_blank”>Brad Leithauser</a> (Darlintong’s Fall, Novel in Verse – Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0375709444/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>, nybooks.com <a href=”http://www.nybooks.com/authors/37″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://shigekuni.wordpress.com/2007/10/08/on-delmore-schwartz/ ” target=”_blank”>Delmore Schwartz</a> (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811201910/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a> and <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811210960/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>
</ul>

<p>&#160;</p>

<p>* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears <a href=”http://user.tninet.se/~jll006w/nfeng.htm” target=”_blank”>here</a>):</p>

<blockquote>
<p>My heart, I said, it was thine;
<br />Thy heart, you said, it was mine

<br />And you said you liked the couplet

<br />Where your tears were mine when you wept

<br />So these were the rhymes we made

<br />Then you married sensibly

<br />I get royalties each time it’s played

<br />And nothing has changed for me

<br /></p>
</blockquote>

<p><strong></strong></p>

<p><strong>Liam’s Favourite Poets:</strong></p>

<ul>
<li>Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)</li>

<li>Tennyson</li>

<li>Emily Dickinson</li>

<li>Yeats</li>

<li>Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)</li>

<li>Seamus Heaney</li>

<li>Jack Clemo (Cornwall) </li>
</ul>

<p>&#160;</p>

<p><strong>Links:</strong></p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://successdiva.wordpress.com/ ” target=”_blank”>Success Diva</a>’s Blog</li>
</ul>

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