Poetry Links from Episode 41: Poetry Revisited(Finally!)

Sep 18, 2009 by

Ok, I’ve finally gotten to them.  They have been lying on my drive for quite a while now, but I’ve managed to get them out from Skype chat notes to the form you see below, which takes a fair amount of time.

Better late than never, so here they are: the Show Notes to our longest, most passionate show on poems to date! 🙂

I’ll update the show notes both on the pages here on Bookbabble.net, as well as the show notes on the podcast host, Mevio.com.

Poems Mentioned in show:

Mentioned in show:

 

* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears here):

My heart, I said, it was thine;
Thy heart, you said, it was mine
And you said you liked the couplet
Where your tears were mine when you wept
So these were the rhymes we made
Then you married sensibly
I get royalties each time it’s played
And nothing has changed for me

Liam’s Favourite Poets:

  • Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)
  • Tennyson
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Yeats
  • Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Jack Clemo (Cornwall)

 

Links:

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Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 2: Poetry Revisited

Aug 8, 2009 by

Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 2: Poetry Revisited

Recorded 3 Aug 2009
Babblers: Bjorn, Renee, Lone, Marcel, Donny and guest Liam Brannelly

Synopsis:
Renee and Marcel have been itching to talk poetry for a while now, and having rescheduled this topic for several weeks, it’s like the floodgates have finally been blown to bloody bits.  For this show, Marcel brought along a nice, intelligent fellow, Liam, who’s a student of medieval literature in New York City who guzzles Beowulf and Chaucer for school and fun.

This show brings together poetry lovers, casual poetry readers, poets and students of poetry all mixed in a heady broth.  There’s appreciation, recitation, and babbling incoherence (oh wait, that’s me).

Oh, did I mention there’s a famous German poem recited in this episode?

This show broke all previous records for show length, and has been broken into 2 parts.  This is Part 2.

Show Length: 85:54 mins

Poems Mentioned in show:

Mentioned in show:

* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears here):

My heart, I said, it was thine;

Thy heart, you said, it was mine

And you said you liked the couplet

Where your tears were mine when you wept

So these were the rhymes we made

Then you married sensibly

I get royalties each time it’s played

And nothing has changed for me

Liam’s Favourite Poets:

  • Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)
  • Tennyson
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Yeats
  • Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Jack Clemo (Cornwall)

Links:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download episode here.

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Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 1: Poetry Revisited

Aug 7, 2009 by

Bookbabble Episode 41 Part 1: Poetry Revisited

Recorded 3 Aug 2009
Babblers: Bjorn, Renee, Lone, Marcel, Donny and guest Liam Brannelly

Synopsis:
Renee and Marcel have been itching to talk poetry for a while now, and having rescheduled this topic for several weeks, it’s like the floodgates have finally been blown to bloody bits.  For this show, Marcel brought along a nice, intelligent fellow, Liam, who’s a student of medieval literature in New York City who guzzles Beowulf and Chaucer for school and fun.

This show brings together poetry lovers, casual poetry readers, poets and students of poetry all mixed in a heady broth.  There’s appreciation, recitation, and babbling incoherence (oh wait, that’s me).

Oh, did I mention there’s a famous German poem recited in this episode?

This show broke all previous records for show length, and has been broken into 2 parts.  This is Part 1.

Show Length: 49:24 mins

Poems Mentioned in show:

Mentioned in show:

* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears here):

My heart, I said, it was thine;

Thy heart, you said, it was mine

And you said you liked the couplet

Where your tears were mine when you wept

So these were the rhymes we made

Then you married sensibly

I get royalties each time it’s played

And nothing has changed for me

Liam’s Favourite Poets:

  • Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)
  • Tennyson
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Yeats
  • Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)
  • Seamus Heaney
  • Jack Clemo (Cornwall)

Links:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download episode here.

<p><b>Poems Mentioned in show:</b></p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.ronnowpoetry.com/contents/vanduyn/IntoMexico.html”>Into Mexico</a>, Mona Van Duyn </li>

<li><a href=”http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poem/702.html”>Homo Will Not Inherit</a>, Mark Doty </li>

<li><a href=”http://www.librarius.com/troicris.htm”>Troilus and Criseyde</a>, Geoffrey Chaucer </li>

<li><a href=”http://nordicvoices.blogspot.com/2009/04/michael-strunge-two-poems.html”>Michael Strunge</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://englishhistory.net/keats/poetry/odeonagrecianurn.html”>Ode on a Grecian Urn</a>, George Keats </li>
</ul>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15401″ target=”_blank”>somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond, by E. E. Cummings</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/another-reason-why-i-don-t-keep-a-gun-in-the-hou/” target=”_blank”>Another Reason Why I Don’t Keep A Gun In The House, Billy Collins</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://oldpoetry.com/opoem/29811-Vladimir-Vladimirovich-Mayakovsky-A-Cloud-In-Trousers—part-IV” target=”_blank”>A Cloud in Trousers, Vladimir Mayakovsky</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://sprayberry.tripod.com/poems/howl.txt” target=”_blank”>Howl, Allen Ginsburg</a> (Interesting history on this poem in this <a href=”http://www.pacifica.org/program-guide/op,segment-page/station_id,4/segment_id,469/” target=”_blank”>article</a>).</li>

<li><a href=”http://andersdenken20.de/2009/04/20/paul-celan-todesfuge-fugue-of-death/” target=”_blank”>Todesfuge [Fugue of Death], Paul Celan</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12169″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 41: If we sang in the wood (and Death is a German expert) by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12053″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 29: There sat down, once, a thing by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12142″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 74: Henry hates the world. What the world to Henry by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12011″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 1: Huffy Henry hid the day by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/john_berryman/poems/12008″ target=”_blank”>Dream Song 14: Life, friends, is boring by John Berryman</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/dolphin/” target=”_blank”>Dolphin, Robert Lowell</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://guccipiggy.objectis.net/poetry/plath/ladylazarus” target=”_blank”>Lady Lazarus, Slyvia Plath</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.jeremygregg.com/quotes/jamesmerrill/lost%20in%20translation.htm” target=”_blank”>Lost in Translation, by James Merrill</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://guccipiggy.objectis.net/poetry/merrill/worldandchild” target=”_blank”>The World and The Child, by James Merrill</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://torch.cs.dal.ca/~johnston/poetry/resume.html” target=”_blank”>Resume, Dorothy Parker</a></li>
</ul>

<p><b></b></p>

<p><b>Mentioned in show:</b> </p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/1594202249/?tag=bookbabble-20″>Inherent Vice</a>, Thomas Pynchon </li>

<li><a href=”http://www.nonsenselit.org/Lear/”>Edward Lear Home Page</a> </li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%B8ren_Ulrik_Thomsen”>Søren Ulrik Thomsen</a>, and <a href=”http://www.literaturfestival.com/bios1_3_6_738.html”>here</a></li>
</ul>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://www.curbstone.org/bookdetail.cfm?BookID=118″ target=”_blank”>Jens August Schade</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Mayakovsky” target=”_blank”>Vladimir Mayakovsky</a></li>

<li><a href=”http://www.loneh.dk/” target=”_blank”>Lone Hørslev</a> (Danish)</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Celan ” target=”_blank”>Paul Celan</a> (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/089255276X/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://user.tninet.se/~jll006w/nfeng.htm” target=”_blank”>Nils Ferlin</a>*</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Strunge” target=”_blank”>Michael Strunge</a></li>

<li>Mark Strand (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0393321789/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brad_Leithauser” target=”_blank”>Brad Leithauser</a> (Darlintong’s Fall, Novel in Verse – Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0375709444/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>, nybooks.com <a href=”http://www.nybooks.com/authors/37″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>

<li><a href=”http://shigekuni.wordpress.com/2007/10/08/on-delmore-schwartz/ ” target=”_blank”>Delmore Schwartz</a> (Amazon <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811201910/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a> and <a href=”http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811210960/?tag=bookbabble-20″ target=”_blank”>link</a>)</li>
</ul>

<p>&#160;</p>

<p>* Bjorn’s Translation of Nils Ferlin’s ‘I folkviseton’ poem (as a contrast to the translation as it appears <a href=”http://user.tninet.se/~jll006w/nfeng.htm” target=”_blank”>here</a>):</p>

<blockquote>
<p>My heart, I said, it was thine;
<br />Thy heart, you said, it was mine

<br />And you said you liked the couplet

<br />Where your tears were mine when you wept

<br />So these were the rhymes we made

<br />Then you married sensibly

<br />I get royalties each time it’s played

<br />And nothing has changed for me

<br /></p>
</blockquote>

<p><strong></strong></p>

<p><strong>Liam’s Favourite Poets:</strong></p>

<ul>
<li>Ferenc Juhasz (Hung.)</li>

<li>Tennyson</li>

<li>Emily Dickinson</li>

<li>Yeats</li>

<li>Boleslaw Lesmian (Poland)</li>

<li>Seamus Heaney</li>

<li>Jack Clemo (Cornwall) </li>
</ul>

<p>&#160;</p>

<p><strong>Links:</strong></p>

<ul>
<li><a href=”http://successdiva.wordpress.com/ ” target=”_blank”>Success Diva</a>’s Blog</li>
</ul>

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Inaugural Poet – Elizabeth Alexander

Jan 1, 2009 by

American President-elect Barack Obama has picked Elizabeth Alexander, an award-winning and Pulitzer Prize Finalist poet, to read a poem at his inauguration on the 20 January 2009.  The poem shall be written specifically by Alexander for the event.

This is only the fourth time in America’s history that a president has invited a poet at the inauguration.  The others were Robert Frost for JFK, and Maya Angelou  and Miller Williams for Bill Clinton.

Alexander says in her website,

Poetry is not meant to cheer; rather, poetry challenges, and moves us towards transformation. Language distilled and artfully arranged shifts our experience of the words – and the worldviews – we live in.

Apparently she is a friend of Obama’s, but when asked if that played a part on her being picked, she had this to say:

“One of the things we’ve seen with every choice he’s made is that it’s based on what he perceives as excellence,” Ms. Alexander said. “I don’t think you would let friendship determine who you chose to do something like this. You can do lots of things to be nice to your friends — you can invite them to an inaugural ball. But I don’t think friends have to do each other this kind of favor.”

Read more about her in the WSJ and NYTimes.

Thanks to About.com.

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Slate’s New Poetry Podcast

Dec 24, 2008 by

Slate already produces some of my most listened-to podcasts, including the Political Gabfest and Slate Daily Podcast (which is the read versions of their selected published articles).  And of course, they have an Audio Book Club podcast as well, which discusses specific books every episode.

One of their newer podcasts is the Slate Poetry podcast, which features poems read by their authors.

Now you can listen to Slate poetry wherever you go. Below, browse Slate‘s weekly lineup of new and renewed work by leading poets, selected by Robert Pinsky and read to you by the author. Or subscribe to Slate‘s new Poetry Podcast feed on iTunes and carry the poems with you.

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